Design and Technology Session with Teens – from 2003

Just a bit of archival preservation here. In 2003 we did a 4-H Career Explorations session on Design and Technology. In the past few years I have looked for, but been unable to find, the documents related to this event. Today I did stumble on them and so thought I would preserve the content here.

Session description:

In this program we will explore and re-design common technology tools including cell phones, gps devices, and hand held computing devices.  We will also take a look at the design process and the impact of users on design evolution. Maximum number of students:  15

Wednesday June 25

2-4:30  Information in the Palm of your hand: Exploring the design rationale for mobile information devices. During this period we will look at the evolution of hand held devices and explore evolution of their current design. Issues of form and function and the design decision process will be explored. Design teams will be formed to begin the preliminary design process for a new device. Design materials for this session will include paper, pencils and markers.

Thursday, June 26

8:30 – 4:00

Morning will begin with presentation by the design teams and discussion of their previous afternoon’s design work.  Changes in the design requirements will be made and a re-design session will begin. This will end at approximately 11am.

11-12 short presentation of redesigns and distribution of materials for the afternoon session.

1-4 transfer of paper based design to 3 dimensional model using clay and other materials.

Friday, June 27

8:30 – 12:00 Presentation of design by teams and preparation for closing ceremony presentation

Usage Scenarios:

conx

| A mobile information device that connects you with your friends. This device would have the ability to communicate with multiple people at the same time and might have the ability to locate them, geographically. Communication could be textual, voice or video.

Scenario 1:

Susie, Luis, Emily, Alex and Phil are going to the mall. Susie needs to go to the Gap, Luis to Zumiez, Emily wants to Best Buy and Alex is going to T.J.’s. Phil is just along for the ride. While at the Gap Susie spots a pair of printed side zip capri’s that she just isn’t sure about:Susie wishes that Emily was here to help her make up her mind. How would ConX be useful here?

Scenario 2:

Wanda, Ray, Roberto, Dexter and Mitzi are visiting New York City. After breakfast at the hotel Wanda, Roberto and Dexter head off to Central Park. Mitzi and Ray hop on the subway and head down to the village. While wandering the streets of the village Mitzi and Ray get separated. Wanda and Roberto head into the central park zoo. Dexter is distracted by the game of 3 card monte taking place on 5th avenue.

Ray turns down Bleeker street and finds a perfect café. He wishes Mitzi were with him…..

Dexter realizes he has lost Wanda and Roberto……

How can ConX help?

 

Open, appropriate, technology and the design of a new world – Version 0, part1.

lb2I recently returned from two weeks in Nicaragua. During my time there we conducted some tech workshops with kids using littleBits (more about that in a future post). While I was there I began to think more closely about the relationship between things like open source, cultural and economic constraints, and so on. I’ve worked with kids and young adults around tech issues for a long time now – sometimes here in New York and sometimes in Nicaragua. I still harbor the firm conviction that tech literacy is now a fundamental need if one is going to take part in shaping a new world, the world we want.

But what became startlingly clear to me (perhaps I am a slow learner?) this time around was the basic powerlessness of teaching tech, so long as it is disconnected from a political orientation, or a political platform. This is perhaps a troublesome thought and possibly poorly articulated. But what I’m trying to get at is something about the point of using technology as a toolkit to build a better, new world, necessitates that tech itself is politicized, contextualized within an operating framework that engages not just tech but the whole social/economic/cultural ecosystem. Because I don’t think it’s possible to build a new world using the constraints of our current system.

Open source is a great concept, but in the context of the political systems we currently work within it is a privileged concept. Access to tools, supplies, even knowledge is unevenly distributed due to a particular system(s) – to enact open source as a robust technology system demands it be a part of a new ecosystem that includes the social, political and economic workings (inner-workings, networkings) across the board.

All of this arises from thoughts about free association and knowledge sharing that I began to put down on January 2nd while in Managua. It was deepened as I moved to the Atlantic coast and began working with kids there. Thoughts of open educational resources, open systems, and networks soon became mired in the realities of daily life – which I only experienced as a spectator. But it rapidly became obvious that the untidy, sometimes ugly, nest of interrelationships between economics, politics, culture and technology cannot be sectioned off and dealt with as autonomous entities.

Each bit of tech we carry, each new thing we teach about, carries with it this intertwined web of economics, politics and culture. The challenge is to be able to use this tangled tool as a lever opening the door to another possibility. Add to that the additional difficulty of respecting difference and diversity and culture and it becomes daunting. But not impossible. I keep coming back to the image of handshaking (in the IT sense of the term). There has to be a negotiated connection that can establish common boundaries and parameters, that does not overwhelm one side of the connection but finds an equilibrium that allows participants to move forward together.

 

Makers,making,diy and hacking citations

As of December 9, 2014: Journal articles I’ve gathered around the topic of makers and making. Many read, a handful left to work through, and more to discover. Does not include books – update on those coming soon.

 

Bevan, B., Gutwill, J. P., Petrich, M., & Wilkinson, K. (2014). Learning Through STEM-Rich Tinkering: Findings From a Jointly Negotiated Research Project Taken Up in Practice. Science Education, n/a–n/a. doi:10.1002/sce.21151

Blikstein, P. (2013). Gears of our childhood: constructionist toolkits, robotics, and physical computing, past and future. Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on …, 173–182. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2485786

Blikstein, P., & Krannich, D. (2013). The Makers ’ Movement and FabLabs in Education : Experiences , Technologies , and Research, 613–616.

Buchholz, B., Shively, K., Peppler, K., & Wohlwend, K. (2014). Hands On, Hands Off: Gendered Access in Crafting and Electronics Practices. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 21(4), 278–297. doi:10.1080/10749039.2014.939762

Dawkins, N. (2014). Do-It-Yourself : The Precarious Work and Postfeminist Politics of Handmaking ( in ) Detroit. Utopian Studies, 22(2), 261–284. doi:10.1353/utp.2011.0037

Fox, S. (2014a). Third Wave Do-It-Yourself (DIY): Potential for prosumption, innovation, and entrepreneurship by local populations in regions without industrial manufacturing infrastructure. Technology in Society, 39, 18–30. doi:10.1016/j.techsoc.2014.07.001

Golsteijn, C., Hoven, E., Frohlich, D., & Sellen, A. (2013a). Hybrid crafting: towards an integrated practice of crafting with physical and digital components. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 18(3), 593–611. doi:10.1007/s00779-013-0684-9

Goodman, E., & Rosner, D. K. (2011). From Garments to Gardens : Negotiating Material Relationships Online and “ By Hand ,” 2257–2266.

Hemmi, A., & Graham, I. (2013). Hacker science versus closed science: building environmental monitoring infrastructure. Information, Communication & Society, 17(7), 830–842. doi:10.1080/1369118X.2013.848918

Hemphill, D., & Leskowitz, S. (2012). DIY Activists: Communities of Practice, Cultural Dialogism, and Radical Knowledge Sharing. Adult Education Quarterly, 63(1), 57–77. doi:10.1177/0741713612442803

Kafai, Y. B., & Peppler, K. a. (2011). Youth, Technology, and DIY: Developing Participatory Competencies in Creative Media Production. Review of Research in Education, 35(1), 89–119. doi:10.3102/0091732X10383211

Kuznetsov, S., & Paulos, E. (2010). Rise of the Expert Amateur : DIY Projects , Communities , and Cultures, (Figure 1), 295–304.

Lindtner, S., Hertz, G., & Dourish, P. (2014a). Emerging Sites of HCI Innovation : Hackerspaces , Hardware Startups & Incubators, 1–10.

Minsky, M., Akshay, N., Amritha, N., Anila, S., Nair, A. C., Gopalan, A., & Bhavani, R. R. (2013). Soft Circuits for Livelihood and Education in India, 2–5.

Moilanen, J. (2012a). Emerging Hackerspaces – Peer-production, 94–111.

Roeck, D. De, Slegers, K., Criel, J., Godon, M., & Claeys, L. (2012). I would DiYSE for it ! A manifesto for do-it-yourself internet-of-things creation, 170–179.

Rosner, D. K. (2013). Making Citizens, Reassembling Devices: On Gender and the Development of Contemporary Public Sites of Repair in Northern California. Public Culture, 26(1 72), 51–77. doi:10.1215/08992363-2346250

Smith, C. D. (2014). Handymen , Hippies and Healing : Social Transformation through the DIY Movement ( 1940s to 1970s ) in North America, 2(1), 1–10.

Tanenbaum, J., & Williams, A. (2013). Democratizing technology: pleasure, utility and expressiveness in DIY and maker practice. Proceedings of the …, 2603–2612. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2481360

Thomson, C. C., & Jakubowski, M. (2014). Toward an Open Source Civilization. Innovations, 7(3), 53–70.

Toombs, A., Bardzell, S., & Bardzell, J. (2012). Becoming Makers : Hackerspace Member Habits , Values , and Identities. Journal of Peer Production, (5), 1–8.

Vossoughi, S., & Bevan, B. (n.d.). Making and Tinkering.

Weinberg, T. (2012). Making ( in ) Brooklyn : The Production of Textiles , Meaning , and Social Change.

Wylie, S. A., Jalbert, K., Dosemagen, S., & Ratto, M. (2014). Institutions for Civic Technoscience: How Critical Making is Transforming Environmental Research. The Information Society, 30(2), 116–126. doi:10.1080/01972243.2014.875783

Zapico, J. L., Pargman, D., Ebner, H., & Eriksson, E. (n.d.). Hacking sustainability : Broadening participation through Green Hackathons.

Zelenika, I., & Pearce, J. M. (2012). The Internet and other ICTs as tools and catalysts for sustainable development: innovation for 21st century. Information Development, 29(3), 217–232. doi:10.1177/0266666912465742

 

Also available over at Mendeley: http://www.mendeley.com/groups/4975081/makers-and-making-diy-hacking/

Minecraft, littleBits – virtual/physical interactions and sensing

This past Jminecraftlilbitsuly we did some work with littleBits and Minecraft (video below) which has lead to some further thoughts and development. Once you start taking these two tools seriously there is a tremendous amount of potential in their educational use. One of the most important aspects for me is the connection of the virtual and the physical. Being able to use Minecraft as one piece of an ecosystem that connects virtual and real provides an easy entry into the module development of a range of activities. littleBits provide a toolkit that we initially used to mirror creation in Minecraft. The expanding range of littleBits modules is continually opening new connectors that allow for an even greater range of activities.

As I was thinking about this I felt a need to map what I view as the current ecosystem for this virtual physical project space. While this is not definitive or static, it captures what I currently see as the key elements – the flora and fauna – of this space. The Minecraft/littleBits symbiosis moves beyond a mirroring of what is created in one is replicated in the other into a robust and modular system that can include programming, micro-controllers and sensors. Mapping physical world interaction into the virtual or having virtual interactions move out into the physical – sensing changes, reacting – all within the creative grasp of kids and curious adults is powerful and facilitates multilayered learning processes.

So what I’m poking at now or in the near future: redstone, sensors, arduino, logic gates, computercraft – still the Minecraft/littleBits combo but expanding a bit to strengthen the virtual physical interactions elements. Look for more specific details, recipes and learnings over the next few months as I (with the help of engaged colleagues and new collaborators) tinker and test.

Raising funds to support technology workshops in Nicaragua

michael-kids-smallerThis January (2015) I’ll be heading off to Nicaragua for two weeks. During my time there I will be conducting several technology workshops with youth. While I am still in the planning process I do know that I will be using littleBits as the core tool set for these workshops. Right now I am hoping to run 4 workshops – 2 on the Atlantic Coast (Puerto Cabezas) and two inland in Matagalpa. While littleBits is donating some modules I am hoping to raise funds to purchase additional modules and possible a few other components. I am not used to asking folks for money like this but as I am self-funding I find that it is necessary if I hope to have a full range of flexibility in the workshop activities and outcomes.

http://www.gofundme.com/gkug8o

This past summer I used littleBits in a workshop for 4-H here on campus and had very good results. You can learn more about that work here: http://littlebits.cc/educator-spotlight-paul-treadwell

As always I am more than happy to talk about this work and answer questions, so please feel free to drop a comment here and I’ll respond.

Thanks,

Paul

Performing Public Narrative: Oral history, play-making and dialog

freddy wavesA bit of history and explanation:

Over the past few years I have done a number of oral history interviews with folks who work for Cornell Cooperative Extension. At the same time I’ve also been involved in work around digital storytelling and social media. Within the past year I’ve been using the public narrative framework as a tool to frame these efforts and create something cohesive out of these work. And during the past few months I was involved with the production of a play that made use of some of the oral histories I have gathered.

I mention all of this in order to give a bit of context to what follows. Some toplay1pics I am reasonably acquainted with, some I am relatively new to and am working to understand more deeply. So, anything I happen to say that is not new, novel or unique likely rises from my current status as active learner among these topic.

Performing Public Narrative: Oral history, play-making and dialog

As part of a larger project I recently worked with some theater folk (Civic Ensemble) in the creation and performance of a new play about the work of extension called Circle Forward. Circle Forward was written by Godfrey Simmons, artistic director of Civic Ensemble, and made use of dialog extracted from a number of oral history interviews I have conducted,. The play also integrated pieces of dialog from some deliberative forums we had conducted as part of the Extension Reconsidered project here, as well as text taken from historical documents.

As this process of creation and performance unfolded I began to think of it as a public narrative – weaving together different components representing stories of self, us and now and staging them in a very deliberate and structured way in order to point towards a future (or futures) for our work.

perform-pub-narrative-1

Performing public narrative

Given that there was only one performance of Circle Forward, I feel as though this is a fairly apt encapsulation of the process. Given time and funding, however, it is easy to imagine this process being fleshed out more deeply (as I am sure it has been in other contexts and topics – just not sure if it has been viewed/understood as public narrative?). With multiple performances that integrated dialog or deliberation after the performance you can develop a spiral, an evolution of the stories of us and now that begins to clearly articulate the critically hopeful story of the future.

Circle Forward – the performance

Some of the stories included in Circle Forward can be found in interviews on our Extension Reconsidered blog .

I am hoping that we can continue to pursue this process and path. There is tremendous potential here to create public narratives that bridge difference, and seek common pathways forward. We need to learn to talk to each other again and there is something deeply magical about theater, performance.

And as a small side note-  though I haven’t yet talked to them some of the interviewees were in attendance at the performance and I wonder how it felt to see and here their words re-staged and performed. I know personally, looking out and seeing them in the audience, knowing that I had sat with them in the interview, had helped facilitate the words to a degree, the experience was …interesting and powerful.

What I’m reading now related to the above:

 



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My Review of Moodle Course Design Best Practices

moodle course design coverLike any powerful system, Moodle offers a daunting array of possibilities to a new course designer and knowing where and how to begin can be a challenging – if not paralyzing – proposition. Moodle Course Design Best Practices offers a cure for that paralysis, providing clear pathways through activities and resources that will enable you to reach your educational goals. It is a book that I wish I had years ago, and one I will recommend to colleagues who are developing new courses.

I mentioned new course designers, but this book has just as much utility to a seasoned veteran of Moodle course development. We all develop habits and shortcuts that get the job done. But in the rush to get things done our habits and shortcuts can do a disservice to our primary educational goals. Moodle Course Design Best Practices can serve as a touchstone for those of us who work with Moodle on a daily basis, helping insure that our learners are navigating through clearly designed and thought out courses in order to reach clearly established goals.

Ideally, I would introduce this book to new course developers along with a volume that digs deeper into the how-to of using Moodle activities and resources. Moodle Course Design Best Practices provides a higher level view of Moodle while supporting a structured and pedagogically sound guide to developing a course. But to be employed effectively these course design strategies have to be matched by an understanding of the technical “how-to” of creating quizzes, workshops and so on. (Packt Publishing offers a companion volume in Moodle 2.0 E-Learning Course Development)

Preparing for Career Ex 2014 HackJam

Osamu IwasakiIt all begins tomorrow. This year we’ll be (hopefully) making and hacking a bit, which is a deviation from my past few yearly sessions and a bit of a challenge. Lately I’ve strayed away from, the hardware and technical aspects of things – focusing more on the social (storytelling) potential of digital media – but this session will return me to my roots in some ways. In prepping for the session I’ve re-visited my early days a bit, recollecting experiences with Hollis Frampton and learning assembly language programming for the 8088. But enough with the nostalgia.

Tomorrow afternoon we’ll introduce the gear we have to work with and form project groups. As always there are varying technical capabilities within the group of 20 kids.I think we’ve provided for that range of capabilities by including a fairly broad spectrum of tech to work with from littleBits to Raspberry Pi, we should be able to find a fit for everyone.

We’ll be updating as we go along over at http://blogs.cornell.edu/careerex2014hackjam/.

My motivations for shifting focus for this session comes from several directions, but the initial genesis can be found in the two paragraphs below (with (some) citations- maybe someday the two paragraphs will grow into a paper):

Working from a Freirean pedagogical foundation I propose enlarging the concept of literacy to include the literacy of hacking. The increasing ubiquity of technology, the pervasiveness of connectedness mediated by technology and the intentionally ‘black box’ quality of so much tech it is now imperative that youth can ‘read’ these technologies. The promise of technology as a method of empowerment necessitates a serious consideration of the ability of users to work with, as opposed to working on, new hardware and software. The literacies of hacking and making are fundamental to the development of technologies that increase freedom.

This process of reading and the development of these new literacies, should lead to a liberatory faculty – being able to re-mix, hack or make, new technology to allow for the emergence or creation of new worlds. These worlds are not predetermined by a corporation, but arise from the combination of imagination, technology and agency. The literacies of hacking moves users from passive and consumptive objects to active subjects (makers).

References

Blikstein, P., & Krannich, D. (2013, June). The makers’ movement and FabLabs in education: experiences, technologies, and research. In Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (pp. 613-616). ACM.

Blikstein, P. (2013). Digital Fabrication and “Making”in Education: The Democratization of Invention. FabLabs: Of Machines, Makers and Inventors. Retrieved from http://www.academia.edu/download/30555959/Blikstein-2013-Making_The_Democratization_of_Invention.pdf

Copeland, S. (2009). Digital Storytelling : A cross-boundary method for intergenerational groups in rural communities A study in rural England, 1–7.

Freire, P., & Macedo, D. P. (1987). Literacy: Reading the word & the world. South Hadley, Mass: Bergin & Garvey Publishers.

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum.

Mayson, S. (2013). People-Centred Desktop Design and Manufacture: a review of web enabled open source tools for localised community focused inclusive design. In Include Asia 2013: Global Challenges and Local Solutions in Inclusive Design (pp. 1-10). Royal College of Art.

Söderberg, J. (2008). Hacking capitalism: The free and open source software movement. New York: Routledge.

Poems I have been using lately

sunflowers

Lately I have been kicking off workshops and some meetings with a poem. This is not a startling new innovation – folks have been doing it for quite some time now – but I’ve begun compiling a collection of what I am calling ‘working poems’. They are linguistic wrenches in my toolbox of conversational (or dialogic, if you want to be fancy) engagement. And,as one workshop attendee replied to me recently “Can’t beat a session that starts with poetry…”. These are my current working poems:

This is an abbreviated list, poems I’m currently employing. I’d be interested in knowing if you have ‘working poems’. Leave a comment and share a favorite or two and help this list grow.

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