Recent Posts

3d printing…like a hot glue gun?

3d printing…like a hot glue gun?

3d printers may not be a pervasive technology at this moment, but the tide is changing. Awareness of the technology is growing . People are beginning to see the potential of 3d printing. This is especially true when you talk about 3d printing compared to […]

Talking about 3d printing at Empire Farm Days

Talking about 3d printing at Empire Farm Days

Empire Farm Days are a big deal for many farmers across New York State. 3 days in August filled with shiny new farm equipment, educational programs and heat. What better place to set up a 3d printer and talk to folks as they wander by. […]

(Civic) Making for Sustainability – Career Explorations 2016 session

(Civic) Making for Sustainability – Career Explorations 2016 session

(Civic) Making for Sustainability – Technology, community and agriculture. 

civic making logoHow does technology connect communities? How can the Maker Movement contribute to sustainability? During this session we’ll explore these questions in order to design and prototype technologies and systems for a vibrant, multifaceted community nexus.

Some of the issues we’ll be exploring include: sustainability and innovative food production, community revitalization and the value of technology and its role in forging community. We’ll work with 3D Modeling, 3D printing, Arduino/RaspberryPi , littleBits, pen and paper and more to develop solutions to our design challenges.

We are hoping for  a mixed group of artists and tech savvy participants for this session. Help us build a diverse team for this community focused session. Sign up today! #civicmakers

Trash or treasure: Developing a game for youth about recycling, trash and community health.

A short presentation about a recent student project in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. Our first attempt at creating an educational game, and an opportunity to learn a lot of lessons about what it takes to do such a thing successfully. As we are thinking about our […]

How can we be of use? Interviewing expectant mothers at Casa Materna, Puerto Cabezas to better understand their health education needs.

How can we be of use? Interviewing expectant mothers at Casa Materna, Puerto Cabezas to better understand their health education needs. from Paul Treadwell

Stardew Valley – first impressions.

It’s all over the internets these days – Stardew Valley is wildly popular. And while I am, at best, a casual gamer I do pay attention, peripherally, to games and gaming. I am an unabashed advocate for Minecraft as a tool for education. So, is the heat and light around Stardew Valley something that will be sustained, and will it lead to utility in educational settings?

Image from: http://stardewvalley.net/
Image from: http://stardewvalley.net/

I’m intrigued, at this point. Mostly, my thoughts have been around the economy at work in the game – when I’m not worrying about the passing of time or trying to make nice with the villagers. It’s an odd thing to be taken in so wholly, so rapidly by a game that seems at first blush to be just a game.

And being single player, at this moment, constricts some of the possibilities for educational use. But it’s hard not to imagine the multiplayer version being developed – sooner rather than later given the games popularity. And then – well what will be the dynamics of interaction between players and villagers…

And that’s a thing with Stardew Valley – it has this tendency to envelope you in its reality in a way that it does not look like it should be able to.  With it’s strictures of time and farm management – watering the damn plants can be frustrating when there’s mining or fishing or foraging to be done and villagers to interact with – economics and planning take a front seat.

There are, of course, a lot more elements to the game. I just wanted to post a first impression. And now I’m thinking about it’s extensibility – it there a pathway into the game system that would allow arduinos, etc…to connect, map data, allow real/virtual interactions? But that’s for another day.

 

littleBits in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua – a review of last years effort and preparing for 2016

This past January (2015) I traveled to Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua as co-leader of a service learning class from Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3). While in Nicaragua we conducted 3 ‘maker’ workshops with youth from a local orphanage in Puerto Cabezas. These workshops introduced littleBits and […]

Creating Community with Technology: Why Making Matters webinar series

The ‘Maker Movement’ has the potential to re-energize learning and revitalize communities. Is it just a flash in the pan or will the Maker Movement continue to grow and infuse new energy into local manufacturing, agriculture and education? This webinar series will look at places […]

A few initial thoughts on Distributed Making.

016f38f18d9a2dcfce77df5284e0e226499b2bb936Recently, I attended MakerCon 2015 at the New York Hall of Science in Queens. It was a packed day and there is a lot to reflect on. Two panels, in particular, stood out for me and I’d like to offer a few comments on one of them today.

The distributed making panel was one of the final sessions for the day but in many ways was an opening for many other conversations that need to unfold around making and its impact in the world. The session focused on the power of networks within the maker movement, and the ability to use these networks for manufacturing at a distance as well as sharing and collaboration. It also emphasized some of the challenges faced by the maker movement if it is hoping to have a real and lasting impact in critical zones.

Critical zones is perhaps a polite way to say disadvantaged, or disaster or war torn communities. But that is one aspect that needs to be addressed head on. Is making a cool hobby, a way for emerging entrepreneurs to prototype new things to manufacture or an emerging alternative to existing structures that can distribute benefits, technologies, etc…(I know it is not an either or but much of what I heard at MakerCon seemed to exclude or, at best, not point towards the potential of maker confederations, cooperatives or any alternative economic system that could arise from a truly democratized technology*). The potential positive impacts of a networked manufacturing process that could create access to cself made and modified tools in the field, on the fly, is (could be) a paradigm shifting innovation. A lot points to that becoming real.

But, even with an optimistic spin, there are major obstacles in the way. Costs, appropriateness of available materials, impacts and consequences of new technologies in the field…there are so many ways  new technologies could be used to replicate existing power systems, or increase imbalances, that it is difficult to remain hopeful. And, especially in regards to technology, we have seen the promise of (insert favorite life changing object or device here) to change the world as not much more that clever marketing scheme.

Even so, some of the stories shared by the panelists at MakerCon were hopeful, even if filled with challenges. David Ott (@d_ott), from the ICRC, grounded the discussion in the realities of humanitarian aid and the possibilities of making in disaster and war zones. The harsh realities were impossible to ignore, and some of the rosy hue of making faded. It may be wonderful to have a distributed network of 3d printers at hand, but if there is no electricity, if the printing materials are of poor quality, if roads are devastated and impassable – well, there is still some distance to travel in order to make distributed making of use in (I was tempted to say atypical situations, but really situations of poverty, disaster and war are more realistically typical, as sad as that is) critical zones.

Sort of on-topic and well worth checking outMakerNurse (and related to the other panel I found very interesting at MakerCon – look for that post soon)

*a long parenthetical deviation that merits its own post- it’s coming…

 

 

Vector Transfer – The irregular podcast. Episode 1

    Links to things: Minecraft/bitcoin – one example: https://www.playmc.com/ Voxelnauts: http://voxelnauts.com/ Virtual Economies (book):  http://www.amazon.com/Virtual-Economies-Design-Analysis-Information/dp/0262027259/


My Diary

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3d printers may not be a pervasive technology at this moment, but the tide is changing. Awareness of the technology is growing . People are beginning to see the potential of 3d printing. This is especially true when you talk about 3d printing compared to older technologies. And while analogies may not be exact, they are useful.

The most common, and unprompted, comparison is with a hot melt glue gun. When you start explaining the extrusion process people lock onto that comparison. And thats enough to begin to make an unknown process knowable.

It is important, I think, to take technologies out into “the wild”. By talking to people we can understand how they put new tools into a familiar context. And from that foundation we can build the discussion, later by layer.

So I spent three sweltering days in a large tin shed as farmers and farm families, wandered by. At least half the folks stopped to look, and from that half another half engaged in conversation. And if I had to guess, I’d estimate that at least 25 conversations were more than just polite curiosity.

It is easy to preach to the choir. But if we have hope in technology as a tool to make the world better, more humane and human, the easy conversations aren’t the ones we need to have.